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How you will have YourSay:

The ACT Government’s response to the Royal Commission puts community engagement at its centre. We are committed to developing change with those who will be affected to ensure we get the best fit for the ACT.

This page is where we will ask for suggestions and feedback on the changes we can make to enhance a culture of child safety in the ACT.

We will be looking at:

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse made 409 recommendations across four reports. The ACT Government has responded to each and every recommendation, and will be implementing as many as we can, as soon as we can.

Engagements in the coming months and years will cover recommendations in the Royal Commission's:

  • Working With Children Checks Report
  • Redress and Civil Litigation Report
  • Criminal Justice Report
  • Final Report

Who can provide input:

All engagements are open to the whole Canberra community yet they may be of particular interest to stakeholder groups working in legal, justice and social service areas.

We will use your views to:

The views you share will help us iron out details in legislation, regulation or other changes we've committed to making in response to the Royal Commission. You will help to ensure the reforms we implement are tailor-made to be effective in the ACT.

History

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse (the Royal Commission) was established in 2013, in response to allegations of sexual abuse of children in institutional contexts that had been emerging in Australia for many years.

The Royal Commission issued a total of four reports:

  • The Final Report on 15 December 2017, containing 189 recommendations. 103 of these are pertinent to state and territory governments.
  • The Working with Children Checks Report in August 2015, containing 36 recommendations, 35 of which are relevant to state and territory governments
  • The Redress and Civil Litigation Report in September 2015, containing 99 recommendations, 87of which are relevant to state and territory governments
  • The Criminal Justice Report in August 2017, containing 85 recommendations, 83 of which are relevant to state and territory governments; and

The ACT Government has been implementing recommendations from Royal Commission since they began to be issued in 2015. Criminal justice reforms improving support to vulnerable witnesses, the establishment of a Reportable Conduct Scheme, removing limitation periods for civil litigation and joining the national Redress Scheme are just a few examples.

Next Steps

In 2018-19, the ACT Government will:

  • Amend the ACT’s Working with Vulnerable People (WWVP) Scheme of background checks, to strengthen protections for vulnerable Canberrans, while reducing the regulatory burden of the Scheme on employers, community organisations and Access Canberra.
  • Continue public consultation on recommendations from the Criminal Justice Report. Legislation, informed by the ACT Government’s consultations, will be progressed in the second half of 2018 and in 2019.
  • Prioritise collaboration with other jurisdictions to progress a new National Framework on Child Safety, which will apply the National Principles in the development of child safe institutions and in the development of government policies, programs, services and interventions.
  • Commence analysis of the current regulatory environment for human services and commence consultation on the impact of implementation of Child Safe Standards.
  • Participate in the development of national approaches to Child Safe Standards and the National Framework for supporting child safe organisations – including consistency between government and non-government sectors.
  • Participate in the development of national approaches to improving information sharing, record keeping and data collection.
  • Participate in the development of national approaches to addressing the complex issue of children with harmful sexual behaviours.
  • Implement recommendations which concluded that survivors should be able to sue a readily identifiable church or other entity that has the financial capacity to meet claims of institutional child sexual abuse.